A year in photos: my top twelve photos of 2017

with No Comments

This past year has been an amazing year for me and my photography. From humble beginnings, taking a few photos for fun at the Garstang Museum, I’ve ended up photographing lots of beautiful ancient Egyptian artefacts, providing photography for the Book of the Dead exhibition and having my images up on the wall of the Tate Liverpool.

As I think back over the last year, and look forward to what 2018 has to bring for me, I thought I’d share some of my favourite photos and moments with you from the past twelve months. So, here’s my year in photos, month by month, for 2017.… Read More

Tate Exchange Workshop: looking back

with 1 Comment

It’s been a couple of weeks since the Tate Exchange workshop now. I’m happy to say that it well and I had such a great week; I was truly excited to see my photos on the wall of the Tate! (I can now tag myself ‘as seen at the Tate’ 🙂 .)

The Tate Exchange space is on the first floor of the building within one of the main galleries, right inside the main doorway:… Read More

Repairing papyri in Photoshop

with 3 Comments

Repairing papyri that have sustained damage over the millennia using Photoshop is something I want to spend some time doing on this project. Whilst employing a conservationist to take the papyri out of their glass containers and reassemble them is a costly and time-consuming affair, using Photoshop to digitally reassemble pieces is much less so (and more fun for me, too).

The process of repairing papyri
So, what is it I’m doing when I’m repairing papyri? The purpose is to pull together and realign broken sections. The example I’m using here is from a copy of the Amduat from the Garstang Museum. The Amduat was a funerary text whose contents showed the nighttime journey of the sun-god through the underworld. This particular copy belonged to a lady called Tjaty from the 21st Dynasty of ancient Egypt (1077–943 BC).… Read More

Another Place, Crosby beach

with No Comments

I live close to Crosby beach in north Liverpool, which has, in recent years, become famous for the Anthony Gormley art installation called Another Place. Also known as ‘the iron men’, the installation consists of one hundred iron statues made from a cast Gormley made of his own body.

Initially intended to be a temporary exhibition, the statues were purchased by Sefton Council and have now been on the beach for over a decade.

To say the iron men are popular with photographers, both amateur and professional, is an understatement. A quick Google image search for ‘iron men Crosby’ brings up lots of photos of the statues, the majority of them being caught on fine, sunny days or silhouetted against a colourful sunset. (Though, to be fair, the winter sunsets at the beach can be just stunning.)

It’s really hard to come up with something that hasn’t been done before.

However, when I woke up to a thick blanket of fog the other weekend, I jumped at the chance to grab my camera and go have my turn at photographing the statues.… Read More

Photographing Egyptology at the Garstang Museum

with 4 Comments

The Garstang Museum of Archaeology is the departmental museum for the School of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology at the University of Liverpool. The university’s where I studied Egyptology, so it’s a place close to my heart.

I’m so excited to share with you that I’m going to be getting my hands dirty at the Garstang with some photographic projects. The curator, Dr Gina Criscenzo Laycock, and I studied for our Masters together, so it’s been really great to catch up with an old friend and get the opportunity to start this project.… Read More

error: Alert: Content is protected !!